Facial Spider Veins & Varicose Veins Removal

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Facial varicose veins are a cosmetic nightmare for sufferers and can be difficult to cope with, as in contrast to varicose veins elsewhere, these cannot be covered up with clothing. Even spider veins and thread veins can be covered with special high density make up, however the problem with facial varicose veins is that they present as a bump on the skin.

 

Unfortunately this type of varicose vein seems to mainly affect post menopausal women and facial varicose veins generally develop as a consequence of the aging process. That said, they can also develop as a result of physical trauma, skin damage due to working outside and sun damage, a family history of varicose veins and the use of steroids, all things that it can be quite difficult to avoid.

 

While make up may provide a temporary solution to the problem, there are a couple of medical techniques that are used for varicose veins elsewhere in the body that can be used to successfully treat facial varicose veins.

 

 

Because the presence of varicose veins on the face is considered to be a cosmetic issue, and unlikely to cause the physical problems that arise as a result of varicose veins in the legs, this will need to be performed by a cosmetic surgeon and may involve several sessions to completely resolve the problem, so it is worthwhile remembering that there may be some significant costs involved in treating the condition.

 

There are two main treatments advertised by cosmetic therapy providers that are often used to treat varicose veins elsewhere in the body. The first is sclerotherapy, guided by ultrasound the medical practitioner injects a liquid chemical or chemical laden foam into the affected vein which causes it to scar and close. This is a relatively non-invasive treatment and is performed under a local anaesthetic so the patient is able to return to work almost immediately.

 

If this procedure is performed on the facial area, it might be advantageous to not return to work afterwards as there is likely to be some localised swelling and redness around the injection sites. If the patient chooses to undergo foam sclerotherapy, it is advisable to ensure that any residual sight disturbances or dizziness has passed before leaving the clinic. Likewise there will be soreness, redness and swelling so returning to work immediately may not be an option when having this treatment on the face.

 

Another more recent innovation in the field of varicose vein treatment has been Endovenous Laser Treatment (EVLT or ELT). An optical fibre is directed into the vein and moved into the correct position. The laser pulses, burning the inside of the vein, causing it to scar and seal.

 

While there is good patient feedback because the veins actually do fade significantly in a couple of weeks, the newness of this procedure and the technology lead it to be more expensive than sclerotherapy, and inevitably there will be some puffiness and marking of the skin immediately after the treatment.

 

One key thing to remember is that these treatments do not treat the underlying causes of facial varicose veins so it pays to take good care of your skin and look after yourself.

 

 

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